Who Invented LASIK?

Who invented LASIK? Though LASIK is a modern procedure, scientists have been working on the problem of visual disturbances since the sixteenth century. Modern LASIK had its immediate precursors in the 1980s, but in truth, the development of the procedure had been in the works for many years.

Leonardo Da Vinci spent some time pondering the source of visual disturbances, and in 1619, Scheiner measured the anterior surface of the cornea. His research is still used by modern ophthalmologists. As early as 1746, Boerhaave was discussing the idea of lens removal to treat myopia, and by the mid-nineteenth century, the advent of topical anesthesia, along with the invention of the keratometer, led to progress in the field of cataract surgery.

In the late nineteenth century, Dutch physician Leendert Jan Lans did such comprehensive and fundamental research on refractive surgery that it became the standard for the field. Scientists and doctors continued to research and refine the practice of ophthalmologic surgery, and by the 1970s, had begun the practice of radial keratotomy. By 1980, keratotomy was performed under guidelines set by the NIH, in a standardized manner, across the United States.

Also in 1980, experts began researching the application of laser technology for vision correction, with the first use of the excimer laser on blind human eyes occurring in 1985. By the early 1990s, Doctors Iohannis Pallikaris and Lucio Buratto had combined lamellar splitting with excimer ablation of the exposed corneal bed. Pallikaris, in fact, came up with the term “LASIK,” which means laser in-situ keratomileusis. Since then, the procedure has evolved rapidly into today’s space-age surgery, almost instantaneous and nearly pain-free.

Aside from having your surgery done by the person who invented LASIK, the best thing you can do is to find a surgeon with experience and skill. Dr. Gary Tylock is such a surgeon, and he leads a committed team of professionals who are dedicated to excellence in patient care, using the most up to date technology. Visit the Tylock website to learn more, or join the online community on Facebook and Twitter.